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The Difference Between WELLness and Illness is I and WE

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Nancy Mazonson, Director of Parkinson’s Family Support Program at Jewish Family & Children’s Services of Greater Boston shares her experience of working with people living with Parkinson’s disease on a daily basis and participating in the Parkinson’s Unity Walk.
Helaine Isaacs
Event Director

“The difference between Illness and WELLness is I and WE.”
Swami Satchidananda as quoted by Dr. Dean Ornish, TED Conference, 2006 and repeated by Bob Kuhn, Opening Ceremony, 2013 World Parkinson Congress

circle hand holdingI experience the sense of WELLness that can only come from WE – from joining with others – every single day in my role as Director of Parkinson’s Family Support at Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Boston. By offering Parkinson’s Dance, Tremble Clef choral singing, support and education groups for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), care partners and adult children as well as information and referral help, I have the privilege of making it possible for people with PD and their care partners to share and connect deeply with others. Our focus is on finding better ways to live well with PD while we wait for a cure. I know for sure that although the Parkinson’s journey can be very challenging, the power of community and the focus on the creative arts can be a healing gift. As one of our dancers said, “This is a caring community filled with camaraderie. Sharing dancing and sharing knowledge with others is good for the soul. It’s so much better than going it alone.”

 

Nancy Mazonson at 2013 PUW

On a sunny April day in 2013, the message of WE truly echoed through Central Park. As a first time walker in the 19th Annual Parkinson’s Unity Walk; as the daughter and niece of men who battled Parkinson’s; and as a professional in the PD world; the energy and connection of the day lifted my spirits. The huge crowd that gathered for the Walk wore everything from matching team t-shirts with a beloved grandpa’s hand print to wacky Viking regalia. Some walked confidently, while others walked haltingly and doggedly – and some rolled along with walkers, wheelchairs or strollers. It was a diverse community all focused on a shared effort to raise awareness and funds for PD research. For those few precious hours in New York, the Parkinson’s Unity Walk offered people who care about Parkinson’s the opportunity to experience the sense of WELLness that can only come from WE – from joining with others.

Please join me in April in Central Park. Hope to see you there!

Nancy Mazonson
Director of Parkinson’s Family Support
Jewish Family & Children’s Services of Greater Boston